Gwen Eberhart

Gwen Eberhart

It is easy to understand why Gwen is enthusiastic about both debating and her studies in Economics at the Vienna University of Economics and Business. She explains that both are about the same thing: Understanding the world in its complexity and diverging opinions. Her way to tackle this complexity is to constantly read into the subjects at hand and discuss them, even from sides which are contrary to her own opinion. This provides freedom from simply emotional complaining or semi-knowledge and grants the capability to soundly criticise the world around her. In the same way debating helps her to structure her thoughts, also for her presentations at university, her studies help her to understand “why things are as they are”. For example, rather than remaining an empty figure, the ECB’s key interest rate becomes an understandable factor that affects the economic and social reality of her life as a European citizen.

Vienna (“the most beautiful city on earth”) is only one of many stations of Gwen’s life. After having lived in Austria, Germany and India, she now settled again in Austria and joined DKWien in summer 2013. Her next adventure is not far away tough, since she will study in Istanbul for an Erasmus exchange semester starting in January 2014. She cannot wait to soak up the culture of her next destination, and the Turkish language will certainly soon enter her linguistic pool to join her knowledge of German, French, English, Hindi and Marathi. An open mind and a companionable attitude towards friends and new people definitely suited her well during her many trips abroad, of which the next stations hopefully will be Lund in Sweden and Scotland. More precisely, they help her to make herself feel “at home” where others might feel as strangers.

Communication and information are the key factors for a successful Vienna EUDC, according to Gwen. That counts as much for the participants as for the OrgCom. The latter always needs to find someone with an ear for needs and questions. Communication within the OrgCom means keeping all volunteers engaged with the project, so that they can identify with it. The only challenge Gwen sees in reaching this aim is that the organisers rarely work for the project at the same time, since all of us live by a personal and study or work itinerary. If she were our EUDC’s chef, she would serve Wiener Schnitzel to the participants, the best dish the country has to offer, simply because the country also looks like a Schnitzel [it’s true, have a look on the map!]. Since such projects would be quite hard to tackle by one person alone, her part of the Vienna Euros OrgCom lies with applications to EU grants as well as project accounting.

Leave a Reply