Roman Korecky

Roman Korecky

Roman’s personal debating story is one of the 21st century in every regard. DKWien’s and his own paths first crossed on the social media platform Twitter, where both our and his personal account were involved in the buzz about a public discussion event we attended. Having thus raised his attention, he also come to see a DKWien debate in person in autumn 2012. He has stayed ever since and now explains that working as part of the Vienna EUDC crew is almost a natural thing to him, which is for the “insanely kind” people in the debating society and the international community. It means giving back to where he himself profited a lot. Such for instance in his English proficiency, for which debating is not only the cheapest, but indeed the best way to improve, he says. No wonder he highlights how important it is inversely that DKWien gives speakers of German as a second language the ability to raise their command of the language in our weekly German debates.

Roman considers himself a team worker through and through: He is one of the few students in his class of Business and Informatics at the University of Applied Sciences Technikum Wien who enjoy the fact that students are grouped in small teams to pull each other through the curriculum. And for Vienna EUDC, he stresses that teamwork means everybody does what the others cannot as a matter of course. ┬áHe would much rather help finish somebody else’s tasks than complain about it. As much as in a football game, the ball only stays out of the own team’s goal and is shot in the right goal if the whole team works together. We see Roman’s decades of professional experience in IT education pay off in our group dynamic in the same way that he manages the project’s IT system that is especially tuned to group collaboration.

If he could pick the host city for another EUDC, he would have it take place in Rome. Yes, right among the ruins of the old forum where once senators debated, and where ice cream parlours and delicious coffee sweeten the wait for the next round. Since Vienna EUDC definitely takes place before Rome EUDC 20xx, he sees the joy of taking part at the event as the key to success both for the participants and organisers. Roman sees no use in being disappointed about any competitive result, instead the Olympic creed should be in the centre of everyone’s experience: “Most important is not to win but to take part.” How could we make taking part alone a great experience at Vienna Euros? Roman says it will be a great week if everybody has the chance to learn a lot, to see the modern city of Vienna and to make new friends.

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